suppression of aging for extreme longevity

COVID-19 predictions: “infectable subgroup” hypothesis

As an amateur in virology, I present preliminary “infectable subgroup” hypothesis to explain: Why COVID-19 epidemic flattened in all countries even with poor mitigation measures Why new cases spike only in some (but not all) counties and US states since reopening   Why epidemiologic prognoses failed In existing epidemiological models (unless I am mistaken), chances to… Continue Reading

Rapamycin for COVID-19 by Mikhail V. Blagosklonny

Section 11 from forthcoming review entitled “From causes of aging to death from COVID-19” (read full review soon) As soon as COVID-19 epidemic started, it become clear that COVID-19 vulnerability is aging-dependent condition and the use of rapamycin (Sirolimus) was immediately suggested by independent researches {Sargiacomo, 2020 #9}, {Zhavoronkov, 2020 #105}, {Zhou, 2020 #94}{Omarjee, 2020… Continue Reading

How rapamycin prevents muscle loss and sarcopenia (first draft)

The effect of rapamycin, an anti-aging drug, on the muscle, was puzzling for a decade. It seemed paradoxical that rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR component 1 (mTORC1), prevents muscle loss and sarcopenia. Yet, this is well established [1-5]. How is that possibly possible?  The nutrient-sensing mTOR pathway increases protein synthesis and cellular mass growth. Furthermore,… Continue Reading

Rapamycin: time is now … unless it’s too late

In 2006, I published an article that aging is not caused by free radicals nor by any kind of molecule damage but instead is a quasi-program driven in part by mTOR (Target of Rapamycin). By sheer luck, mTOR inhibitors – Sirolimus (rapamycin) and Everolimus – were clinically available. As I summarized in 2006: “…all diseases… Continue Reading